Can YOU help track down Filtrate Lambretta pilot Marlene Parker?

Marlene Parker on Filtrate Lambretta
Back in 1965, Marlene Parker, a 22 year old Bristol Taxi driver, was selected from 67 female applicants from across the country to ride a Lambretta scooter in Monza in Italy and break the world record. Marlene went on to ride the Filtrate sponsored Lambretta to a record beating 110 mph.Filtrate Lambretta Record AttemptNow, nearly 50 years on, the team behind this record is reuniting… and they’ve even found the original machine, which in now in the hands of The Scooter Center, the German specialist scooter shop, who intent to completely rebuild it and return it to its former glory.

The only problem is nobody knows where Marlene is now. Robert Forest-Webb, who designed the machine and now lives in Hertfordshire, said “The only person missing, and who was probably the most important person of all, is Marlene. Does anyone know where she may be found? Can anyone help us? If you know, then please get in touch.”

The Bristol Post has got behind this story, and is helping try to track down Marlene. Their reporter, Emily Koch, would love to hear from you.You can Email her here, or phone her on 0117 934 3412.

Marlene Parker Filrate Lambretta Record  Attempt

Read more on the Bristol Post site.

Via The Scooter Fix Facebook page

UPDATE: In my eagerness to stick this post up, I didn’t realise the original Bristol Post article was from 2009… so it may well be that Marlene has been located. I’m attempting to follow up the story, if you know more (has it been in Scootering for instance, and I missed it) lat me know and I’ll run an update. Another one.

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Lambretta World Land Speed Record Scooter

Lambretta Record Breaker LambrettaRecord02dailyicon LambrettaRecord03dailyiconFrom day one Innocenti were eager to to prove to the world that their engine was, for it’s capacity, the fastest and most economical in the world.

IW_Lambretta-record_06 IW_Lambretta-record_08 IW_Lambretta-record_09They participated, and won, many speed and endurance competitions, entering one off specials and works racers… with many of the lessons learned from the track making their way into later production scooters.

One of their great rival, in the scooter world, was of course was Piaggio… who were also keen to prove the prowess of their Vespas on the track. Both manufacturers saw the promotional opportunities in promoting their victories. Not only did it help establish the respective marques as viable purchase options, but it countered the entrenched wisdom of the time that these small wheeled, open framed machines could compete with motorcycles. It wouldn’t be too much of stretch to say these competitions helped establish the whole scooter category, that went on to dominate two wheeled vehicles in the 50’s and early 60’s.

After many close fought encounters Lambretta went on to dominate the category… breaking records over long and medium distances. But there was one goal yet to achieve… breaking the 200km/h barrier over the ‘flying kilometre’. This was achieved on the 8th August 1951, in the amazing, full enclosed vehicle shown below, with Romolo Ferri as the ‘pilot’.

LambrettaRecord04dailyicon 42-18541976With Lambretta now holding all the 125cc class records Piaggio decided there was no point in opposing them anymore, and the battle was over, with Lambretta the acknowledged champions.

Via Italian Ways

And Racing History on the LCGB site.

New record for riding a Lammie no handed

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Don’t try this at home kids!

Lussio Lisarelli from Gubbio, in Italy had a liver transplant a few years ago. He wanted to show the world what 70 year old transplant survivors could do. So he decided to go for the world record for riding a Lambretta, without using your hands. Like you do. 

Suffice it to say, he did it, travelling 1,150 metres, and exceeding 13 minutes. No handed. On a Lambretta. For the technically minded who wnat to work out how he did it I’m going to cut and paste directly from the “To lead 2 stroke” (Italian) vintage scooter blog where I found the story.

“Lucio part, meshes with the gears up to the 2nd or 3rd as needed, and then locks the knob with a rubber band already rolled up on the handlebar”

You might understand that, but I’m none the wiser. Sounds dangerous enough without locking your knob up with an elastic band… but I think it may just be lost in (Google) translation 🙂