Lovely Italian Model…

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…with Cristina Buccino sitting on it! Cristina is a model and actress from Italy, and may have a soft spot for the Lambretta, as I’ve managed to find another picture of her on one… the ill-fated LN of a few years ago.

If you’re interested in finding out more about Cristina, her website is worth a gander – its in Italian, but if you can’t read Italian, you can just look at the pictures…

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Scootering, Maltese Style.

20150426_173710Sandro from Malta got in touch, initially interested in doing a deal on the Maserati scooter I featured a while back. I saw he had some interesting scoots, and persuaded him to send me some pictures…

Here’s his Lambrettas…

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Here is his Vespa U… 20150510_192046

The Vespa U is one of the rarest of all Vespas. Looking a lot like the Allstate model produced for the US market, the Vespa U was a ‘bare bones’ economy model. But the public at the time preferred spending a little more for a more refined /well equipped Vespa, and so it was cancelled  after  only machines were 6000 produced. Lambretta had a similar idea with their ‘E’ model, a similar commercial flop. 3,500 U’s were sold off to either Iran or Iraq (accounts vary!)for use by the government post office – and disappeared after that. Today, there are maybe 20 machines left on the planet…and Sandro has one 🙂 So, initially a commercial failure but now one of the most desirable of Vespas!


And here’s his rather lovely Iso Diva Milano.

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It’s a Series 1 (and an early Series 1 at that), replete with super rare period accessories. Itself a rare machine, with only 2,000 series 1’s produced…

EDIT: I’ve just noticed the Iso Milano that was on eBay before Christmas has been relisted, now you can see how beautiful it could look, are you interested? Here it is on eBay


Finally,  here’s some other Maltese scooters…

The scene in Malta is quite strong, with 70 or 80 classic scooters on the road, (and many more in garages and back yards – aint that like everywhere!).

Thanks Sandro, I appreciate the pics, and great way to kick off the New Year on the blog!  If you’ve got a scooter collection, or would like your club featured (wherever you are in the world), get in touch and we’ll see if I can feature you on the blog.

Istanbul Trip D

lambretta-johnmockett-dOne of my readers, John, sent me this fantastic pic of him on his Lambretta D150. He was getting it ready for a trip to Istanbul with 3 friends… another D’s and an LD with two-up. They stopped for a while
in Yugoslavia, and even took Franco era Spain in on the way back, stopping off in Barcelona.

“Ian then took off for Copenhagen, and then eventually I came home.
You just sat on the D150, and opened the throttle. It did 55 on the clock forever…
Barcelona to home in 2 and a half days. Rather different to today’s 2 wheeled tourists.”

Quite a trip… quite an adventure.

I love these period pics – if you’ve got something similar sitting in a drawer – wether you rode your Lambretta to Istanbul or just to work… I’d love to see them!

Lambretta Legend Cesare Battaglini

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Lambretta adventurer and legend Cesare Battaglini, who travelled160,000km round the world on his modified Lambretta in 1956, the greatest of many expeduitions on hs Lambretta. He continued riding his beloved Lambretta into his eighties, and was an active and revered part of the Lambretta scene right up to his death in 2011, at 84 years old. cesare_action_lambrettista

The story of Dr. Battaglini can be read over on the Lambretta Watches site, where their Cesare watch honours the great man.

Also available on Amazon here.

Marco’s Model D For Sale

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I came across this little cracker while perusing the Rimini Lambretta website. Lazily, rather than paraphrase their description, I’m just going to cut and paste it below…

Description:

This Lambretta is owned by Marco who works for RLC and is one of his personal scooters. He has decided to let it go due to not having enough time to enjoy the scooter and rather than have it just sit there unused, he’d rather that someone else gets the pleasure from it. 

The scooter is all original and the waterslides were added by the sole previous owner during his travels in the 60’s. The amazing accessories are all originals and period parts. Most were on the scooter when Marco purchased it a few years ago and there are some REALLY choice parts that are either very expensive or nigh-on impossible to locate. Marco rebuilt the engine recently with no expense spared so it runs and rides as good as it looks – so much so that Marco has actually toured with this scooter and it performed faultlessly. 

If you want an original classic that is draped in history and choice parts, look no further! This Lambretta D125 is the real deal and no mistake. The scooter comes with full, current Italian documents.

Condition:
Super conserved, runs and rides PERFECTLY. All original. Loads of choice accessories and it comes with full Italian documents.
I think this is a  fabulous looking scoot… I love the period accessories… I’ve seen plenty of great “D’s” but nothing quite like this! It’s up for sale for €10,000 (or £7,796 in proper money). Now, I’ll concede that is a lot of money for a D. But for this D, I think it’s about right. If I had it, I’d be straight on the phone. More here.

Spanish D

SpanishD10.00.51Iain Hannay sent me some fantastic pics of a Model D, that he’s just got running…  built in the Eibar factory, in the Spanish Basque country.

SpanishD10.01.01SpanishD10.01.10SpanishD10.01.16SpanishD10.02.24SpanishD10.02.48Now, I see a fair few Spanish Series 2 Lambrettas these days (much more than I used to, for some reason), and Jet 200’s are getting recognised as very desirable scooters… but I haven’t seen many early open frame models. If any, truth be told.

Iain’s D has some nice period accessories, the legshield extenders, and the spare wheel carrier / rack… and I love that oxblood paint. A cracking little scooter, that looks great in the Spanish sunshine!

I’d love to see any other old Spanish Lambrettas… any Spanish LD’s or Series 1’s out there? And what differentiates them from their Italian cousins?

 

Hugo’s LD 150 and Model D watercolours

ld125hugo-10-14002_lambretta_rps23I’ve been following Hugo’s blog for a while now, he has set himself the task of producing a fresh new drawing every day and posting it on his blog… something he’s been doing for over three years now. His watercolour sketches have a wonderful combination of “looseness” and accuracy. In a recent visit to MuVIM ( Valencian Museum of Enlightenment & Modernity – now theres a title!), he sketched the Lambretta Model D, and LD on display, along with two Spanish bikes. I don’t know about you, but I think he has really caught the essence of the machines!  To cap it all I even got a mention in his blog, which made my day! Check out the original post here, and his blog here.

F is for FORKS, F is for FURTHER INFORMATION

LambrettaModellFWhen I originally posted about Rod’s Western Australian Barn Find of a rare Model “F”, one of my eagle-eyed readers queried whether I’d made a mistake in classifying it as a F, as the forks didn’t have the distinctive ‘swept back’ look of the E’s and F’s. Check out the image above to see what I mean.

Well, you can write what I know about these early models on the back of a postage stamp… so I went back and queried it with Rod, who patiently sent me back pics of the frame and engine numbers both confirming it’s F status. Very weird. Was this some Aussie import F with D type forks? The explanation is a little simpler.

The Model F was based on the Model E… the E being a rethinking of the open frame Lambretta, with economy at it’s heart. It was stripped down, and the cheapest Lambretta you could buy, featuring an innovative, and frankly pretty poor “pull-cord” like a chainsaw or outboard engine instead of a kickstart. It was not well received by the Italian market, in fact it was a total flop. Innocenti then made some technical improvements, including reinstating a kickstart and this new model became the F. The improvements weren’t enough to radically improve sales however… and even an ‘elegant new colour’ (dark green) wasn’t enough to distinguish the F from it’s ill fated predecessor.

In 1955 a Second Series of the F was produced with many technical improvements from the first, more comfort, better electrics, and the more efficient fork and front fender from the Model D. It is one of these “Seconda Serie” with D forks that Rod discovered in a shed. The second series came in two colours… The putty like “Beige Sabbia” and “Grigio Chiaro”, a pale grey. Rod’s pics show traces of this original grey under the blue paint that was applied sometime back in the dim and distant.F1-F2

Unfortunately, although these changes had made the Seconda Serie F a much better scooter, it never shook off it’s Model E lineage. Sales figures could not justify it’s continued production, and the last F was made in early 1956. Which means one more thing… F stands for, erm, FLIPPING Rare.

Thanks Rod, for furnishing me with various articles that explain the complicated saga of the F with D forks!

F is for FIND – Aussie barn find!

photo 5 photoOne of my readers, Rod got in touch from Western Australia yesterday, very excited about a scooter that had turned up in a shed where it had sat, unmolested for the last 35 years. It’s a Model F, The F is a pretty rare sight these days… I think by the time it was being produced in ’53 to ’54 the panelled LD was becoming the dominant Lambretta model, and they were of course also still selling the latest incarnation of the D model, one of Lambretta’s most successful models to date.

Something in the back of my mind tells me the E’s and F’s were more successful as the front end of Lambretta’s commercial range… but my knowledge of these vehicles is almost non-existent, so maybe you could enlighten me if you know more!

photo 3  Anyway, back to Rod’s F. He managed to pic it up for A$350. As you can see from the pics, it’s not in too bad condition, and Rod says everything is there, and completely original, barring the lock for the boot cover plate. So if you’ve got one of those around, drop me a line and I’ll put you in touch with Rod.photo 4 photo 5 photo 6photo 7 photo 8 photo 9 photo 10These wonderful  tax discs tell their own story… the two older older two ones were behind the top one… so the scooter has been resting in that shed since 1976… 38 years! Rod is now approaching the Department of Transport to see if he can get the original number plate; UG 322.photo RodsF1 And I know it’s superficial, but I think my favourite part of the whole scoot is the original “Aussie Rules” Shell decals on the inside of the inside of the leggies…  a real period piece!

Rod on ModCNew owner Rod is no newbie when it come to Lambrettas either… He’s sent me this fantastic pic of himself astride his first Lambretta, a C Model, in about 1960 when he was 17, which he later upgraded to a D Model, pictured below. Just shows, once you’ve got the  Lambretta bug, you’ve pretty much got it for life. I can’t wait to see pics of Rod riding his restored F in the Aussie sunshine. Keep us posted mate!ModelD

The last pic, and probably my favourite, is Rod 53 years after the shot on his “C”, obviously enjoying his new purchase…RodF-53 Years Later

F is for FORKS…

A couple of eagle-eyed readers have pointed out that the forks don’t look correct for the model F, as you can see in the pic below, they are ‘swept back’ rather than the more standard Lambretta style forks, as seen on the D, and evolved on later models. It’s being looked into! UPDATE: The forks problem has been resolved, but it warrants a post of it’s own (stay tuned). We’ll leave it at this for the moment: A) Rods Lammie is DEFINITELY an F, and B) I’ve learned something new!LambrettaModellF

 

 

Mike Karslake on Pepple Mill

A bit of nostalgia for you… whenever I was off school back in the ’80’s…there wasn’t much telly on… I remember stuff like Crown Court and General Hospital… and then, at lunchtime, there was always Pebble Mill. Here’s an episode from the 80’s featuring Lambretta legend Mike Karslake, and some of his extensive Lambretta collection, including his Lambretta based fire engine and Wolfie’s Lambretta from Citizen Smith! He makes quite an entry on a Series 2 sidecar combination!

Via GP225 Wildcat’s YouTube Channel.