Officially Licensed Lambretta Scale Models

Spotted these on Amazon… a range of decent looking Lambretta models, four in total…… that would grace any Lambretta lovers’ china cabinet (if people have such thing these days). Theres a Model A, An LI Series 1, a Series 2 Rallymaster and a GP200.

The attention to detail looks pretty good, although I’ve only seen the photographs, not the models in the flesh. Here’s the blurb: Officially Licensed Lambretta scootesr that have been faithfully recreated with handsculpted and handpainted additions for outstanding detail” The scooters are approximately, 8cm in height, 10cm in length.

They’re made by the Bradford Exchange. Pics and links below… there appears to be fairly limited stock, so get your orders in quick if you want one!

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Model A on Amazon


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LI 150 Series 1 on Amazon


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Series 2 Rallymaster on Amazon


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GP on Amazon


ProBikeART – Stunning Studio Shots of your Scoot

b16555So you’ve spent a few quid getting your scoot the way you want it… why not spend a few more documenting it for posterity? You could take some snaps yourself, or do it properly (your the kind of person that does things properly, right?), and get it shot professionally in a studio… except most studios are set up to shoot people, not motorcycles and scooters.

That’s where ProBikeArt comes into the picture. Professional studio photography that captures the lines and details of your Lambretta in the best light. Photographer Ian Daisley specialises in shooting classic, racing and cherished motorcycles – but he’s shot a few Lambrettas – as you can see!eg5a9381eg5a9322eg5a9333

A basic studio session costs just £145… including your finished digital images supplied on disk, and a 300x400mm framed fine art print.

ProBikeArt are located near Matlock in Derbyshire. Get in touch with them here.

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All images used by permission, and © Ian Daisley / ProBikeART (www.probikeart.co.uk)

The final rideout…

dsc00132We often don’t like to think about our own mortality, but there comes a time in your life when you start going to as many funerals as weddings. And we probably all know somebody in the scootering scene who has passed on, usually far too early.

dsc00119Although obviously sad affairs, the best funerals can be wonderful too, especially when you celebrate a life, and the passions of the deceased. What better way for someone that loved their scoots to make the final journey in a Lambretta powered hearse?

dsc00129To quote the websiteOur unique Scooter Hearse draws together an authentic Series 3 Lambretta professionally converted to a trike by a master coach builder, the same craftsman also fabricated the Hearse that is pulled behind. Beautifully combined this set up pays complete respect to the deceased, a person who had a love for the scooter, the scene that surrounds it, a scene that to those outside can sometimes seem extraordinary but for those in the know is something magical.”

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Personally, I can’t think of a better way to celebrate the life  of a scooterist. That number plate’s good too.

Contact Modified Funerals, Telephone: 074 6841 0057
Email: modifiedfunerals@gmail.com
or via their website, here.

 

Silly money?

The price of Lambretta scooters seems to be reaching new heights, as a quick glance at eBay will confirm. A TV175 Series 3, for the best part of £15k, an SX200 for a ‘buy it now’ price of £12k, and an Italian GP for £7,779… All very nice looking scooters… but that’s a lot of your hard earned cash to spend on a scooter.

The first one is, admittedly a beautiful machine, and the only one of the three I’ve seen in the flesh. Restored by the world famous RImini Lambretta Centre… so you know everything will be done to the highest standard. But still… that’s a lot of dosh. Check it out on eBay here.RLC0TV175S3-1RLC0TV175S3-2

The second is another very desirable scooter; a British Registered SX200, in champagne and white, still with it’s original Ken Cobbing seat. Matching frame and engine numbers and original panels and bodywork. Bit still… a little steep at £12K?
Here it is on eBay

EBaySX2009k-1 EBaySX2009k-2 EBaySX2009kIf GP’s are more your thing… there’s a nice, 1969 original Innocenti 200. Restored to a high standard, and looking lovely in yellow ochre. A steal at just £7,779? If it’s for you, here’s the eBay link

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And it’s not just the more desirable models that are getting expensive… here’s a 150 LD going for £4800… something that would have seemed, if not unthinkable, an “ambitious” price, just a few years ago. Here’s the eBay link to the LD

EBay150LD-1EBay150LD copy

So, are these machines actually worth these price tags? They’re all very desirable scooters, and look like they’ve been restored to a high standard. So, ultimately, the market will decide. It’s hard to see prices dropping in the future, so a classic Italian scooter may be a good investment, even at these prices. But remember, these machines are always better ridden than hidden.

There are still plenty of more affordable Lambrettas out there, but they may be either less cosmetically attractive, needing some work, or complete ‘projects’. I suppose it’s good news if you already own a Lambretta, or are in a position to buy and restore one… but the downside is it’s getting increasingly difficult for youngsters to get involved in our scene.

Moody brakes…

Julies GP Moody BlueJulie in Norfolk sent me a pic of her lovely GP, which she’s lavished a lot of money and attention on… a beautiful scoot. Trouble is, she’s having problems with her brakes… it “shudders like anything” on braking… but only on bumpy roads. She asked me for a bit of advice, but I’m not really qualified to help, especially with something as vital as brakes. I recommended she ask on the LCGB forums, which I’ve always found helpful… but if you guys have any ideas, feel free to leave a comment…

eBay Watch

I always keep an eye on eBay; just to see if there is anything interesting or unusual that would benefit from a post on the blog. Often it’s quite uninspiring… but then sometimes theres a run of scooters that just “do it” for me… Here are a trio of Lammies, all a bit different from the ‘run of the mill’ that are up on eBay at the moment.

Firstly, this rather tasty pink GP…
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A guaranteed headturner /conversation starter! Here’s the eBay link

Next, another love it or hate it colour… chocolate brown… It’s a bit of a 70’s/80’s thing. 15409066514_2dbcfa7888_z

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If that floats your boat, here’s the link to that one<img style=”text-decoration:none;border:0;padding:0;margin:0;” src=”http://rover.ebay.com/roverimp/1/710-53481-19255-0/1?ff3=2&pub=5575075368&toolid=10001&campid=5337446923&customid=&item=291370650312&mpGeneralLeeTS1 2Finally, for now, here’s “General Lee” a nicely put together “Southern” themed cutdown TS1. I’m guessing the builder of this watched a bit of “Dukes of Hazard” back in the day…GeneralLeeTS1-1

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GeneralLeeTS1-3Here’s the link

Lambretta Vlog Time…


T’internet’s a funny old thing isn’t it? Always something new to discover. I just stumbled across “Lambretta Vlog Time” a Video Blog about a guy and his Lambrettas. And it was episode 16. Which means I’ve missed the first 15 somehow. Oh well… some catching up to do! One of my less tiresome jobs to do this week! I probably won’t repost all 15 on here… but I will post the best, and hopefully give you a heads up when a new one pops up!

This one focuses on a nicely restored GP which is nearly finished, and looks like will be up for sale soon. Check out the rest of the vids for yourself on digger9million’s YouTube Channel, here.

Shelby AC Tribute GP

AC-Readspeed230Here’s a superb Readspeed GP TS1 230 up for sale on the bay… “designed to replicate the Shelby AC Cobra race car whilst keeping the genuine originality of the Lambretta and the GP200 it originated from. As such every detail of the build was meticulous even down to the dark blue metallic and Wimbledon white paint which was from the Shelby works in Las Vegas” 

An original Italian GP 200 with matching frame numbers, the current owner reckon stop have spent over £25k getting the scooter to look this good. One of the ‘signature pieces’ is the (genuine Taffspeed) exhaust, modified to replicate that of the AC Cobra, which , along with the vented side panels make this scoot truly unique.

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Here it is on eBay

Classy classic combo

Gulf Racing themed Lambretta Sidecar COmbinationThe Gulf Racing colours of pale blue and bright orange are a classic and recognisable combination that work so well together.  I’ve seen them on many vehicles, from Porches to Beetles, Mini’s, bikes and a fair few scoots over the years. But I think this is the first time I’ve seen them on a Lambretta sidecar combination.  In my ever so humble opinion, it works. And it’s for sale on eBay. The scooter (a GP 150) has been upgraded to with a GT 186 kit, so should pull that Watsonian along nicely. It’s on eBay here. But be quick, the auction ends today.Gulf-Bambini-2-6-9-2014Gulf Bambini GP Gulf-Bambini-3-6-9-2014 Gulf-Bambini-4-6-9-2014 Gulf-Bambini-5-6-9-2014
Here’s that link again

Pop Artist

If I said the name Horace Panter you would probably think of The Specials, at least if you have a decent taste in music and you’re of a certain age! As Sir Horace Gentleman, he was (and still is) the bassist for one of the most iconic bands of the ’80s, spearheading the 2-Tone movement. What you may not know is that Horace and Jerry Dammers met at Art School… where they were both studying  Fine Art.

Today, Horace is very much a painter as well as a musician. He paints in a very Pop Art style… following the mantra of ‘elevating the mundane’, taking a fresh look at the familiar, encouraging the viewer to see ‘everyday’ objects/people with new eyes. I can see influences of British Pop Art’s leading figures, Peter Blake, and also of one of his pupils… Ian Dury (also an accomplished artist) in his work.

Horace’s paintings are often inspired by random events and people. One such painting, ‘The Scooterist’ resulted from a chance meeting with a posse of scooterists outside Coventry’s Transport Museum.The Scooterist © Copyright Horace Panter Art 2014

Horace was asked by local filmmaker, Richard Wood, to participate in promoting a charity event to raise funds for Clare House Hospice in Liverpool. This involved the car, HERBIE (from the eponymous film) being driven from Liverpool to Monte Carlo and Horace joined Lady Godiva (Pru Poretta) on its journey from The Ricoh Arena to the Transport Museum. This short journey was accompanied by a whole raft of vintage VW’s and an honour guard of local scooterists.

It is generally true that scooterists are fans of The Specials so while they were all busy snapping photographs of Horace, he decided to reciprocate and turned his camera on them. Sifting through his photographs later, he turned his attention to the remarkable detail on the scooters and decided to paint one with its rider on board in his typical icongraphic style. He says: ‘There were some amazing scooters … really detailed. All that stuff about pride in appearance, everything just right in terms of both scooter and scooterist, I love it.

Horace didn’t know who the rider was so he put out a call on Facebook and Twitter to ask if anyone could identify the mystery scooterist. Within minutes, responses started to come in and they weren’t all the same! However, half a dozen people pointed to Carl Barlow from the Low Numbers Scooter Club in Leamington Spa. 
It was definitely him, as other photos testified. Horace then contacted Carl by sending him a message on Facebook but by then Carl had had dozens of texts and emails from his friends to tell him that Horace had painted his portrait. Happily, mystery solved. Carl says ‘Over the moon that Horace has chosen to do the pic of me; it’s a real honour! I’m thrilled that he will be letting me have a print. It’s a wonderful painting … not just because I’m in it!’ I’m with Carl on that. There is a real ‘iconic’ feel to the work.

The original painting has been sold. There is a limited edition of 35 prints (40 x 23 cm) available from the galleries listed on Horace’s website: HoracePanterArt, where you can check out his other work, including his series of ‘Cassette’ paintings. You can also check out his Facebook page, and follow him on Twitter.

A big thank you to Clare in helping me put this post together.