Lambretta Locomociones

Pictures from the Spanish Lambretta Factory in Eibar

A couple of posts back, I wrote about the Lambretta Amiga – the last throw of the dice for the Serveta factory in the Spanish Basque country (here). I gave a short potted history of the Spanish Lambrettas – Reader Darrin Slack got in touch, and shared some fantastic images he had of the Eibar factory (I said he had shared a bunch of great content with me, didn’t I – stay tuned – there’s more to come).The pictures below are of the purpose-built factory that started building scooters in 1954 – just two years after a group of Basque businessmen obtained a licence from Innocenti to build Lambrettas in Spain.

The Drawing office –
Tube bending machines – making the frames for the scooters
Sidepanels coming out of the hydraulic press – who knew that they were made in pairs?
Legshields being finished – note the distinctive turning front mudguard of the Winter Model in the foreground, and stacked up on the left hand side of the image.

The Basque factory was very successful – initially catering to the domestic Spanish market… as can be seen in the image below, they made at least 3 million machines…

Thanks again to Darrin for the fantastic images. If you’re interested in finding out more about Spanish Lambrettas – check out this site Serveta is Betta.

Rare Lambretta Amiga Parts on eBay…

A couple of weeks ago, I was browsing through the Scooter Restorations site, as I often do when I have a spare ten minutes. I’ve posted a few desirable rare Lambrettas for sale on the blog. Now, I know they specialise in ‘rare’ Lambretta parts, from the model A onwards… But I noticed they had (a few) parts for a Lambretta Amiga. A Lambretta that it never even made it to production. In fact, even pictures of it are rare… although there does appear to be a prototype in the Museo de la Industria Armera in Eibar, Spain. (If the name Eibar doesn’t ring a bell, it probably should, it’s the industrial town in the spanish Basque Country – Euskadi – where Lambretta’s were manufactured (sometimes under the name Serveta).

So it’s rare. We’ve established that. But is it desirable? Well, maybe. But I would hazard a guess at ‘only to a completist’ or only to people really into 80’s/90’s design.

Spanish machines are increasingly sought after in the UK, the Eibar Lambretta Winter Model and Serveta Jet 200 being particularly prized. The last real model to roll off the production line was the Serveta Lince (Spanish for Lynx), which was still very recognisably a Lambretta – albeit – like a 60’s pop star with a facelift and a spray-tan – a Lambretta with a distinctly 80’s make-over.
I wrote about the Lince back in 2013 – here – since then my opinions on many things have mellowed, but sadly not my rather forthright views on the Vespa PX. Anyway I digress. Not like me is it? Back to The Lince. Sadly, although a modest success (over 1,500 made) the Lince was not going to secure the future of Spanish Lambretta production. So it was back the the drawing board, and in 1987, it probably was still designed on a drawing board, CAD being in it’s infancy. I’ll tell you one thing though, they made good use of their rulers that day.

The Amiga was Spain’s attempt to take The Lambretta brand into the ’90s… and one thing you can definitely say of The Lambretta Amiga was that it’s of it’s time. In typical late 80’s fashion anything resembling a sensuous curve was squared off – it was straight lines all the way, baby.
And it wasn’t the only product they had in mind either, there was a rather funky looking trike – The Lambretta Tron – and an Lambro/Vespa Ape type commercial vehicle – The Motocarro Lambretta. The Tron even made it to prototype stage – I can feel another post coming on.

Back to the Amiga. Although it never made it past the prototype stage, there was big talk at the time of The Amiga being “The New Lambretta”. I remember reading an article about it (probably in Scootering) and being absolutely horrified – having a real “What the fuck have they done” moment, and thinking it was like a stormtrooper crossed with a Honda Melody. And not in a good way. (The design of the Honda Melody has aged pretty well, actually, but back in the late 80’s, to any Lambretta or Vespa rider the words Honda and Melody were about the worst insults you could throw at a machine). Anyway. I’ve waffled on far too long. There’s some Amiga bits on eBay, here. Basically, a frame (with some bits bolted on – the fuel tank and the rear shock), the forks and front wheel, and the headset, including the distinctive speedo. There’s no bodywork, seat or engine, although I’d imagine a standard Lambretta/Serveta lump would fit.

A final note, I’m pretty sure that when I originally looked, Scooter Restorations had an Amiga speedometer in stock. It’s now showing as “out of stock”. Which begs the question… “Who bought it?” and “Why?” Is someone out there building an Amiga? I’d love to know! If it’s you, please get in touch, I love to know more!

Something for the weekend – April 13th & 14th

Morecambe Pre-Season Scooter Rally

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Facebook Event Page


Encuentro Vespa & Lambretta de Driebes

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Facebook Events Page


BSSO Scooter Racing – Mallory Park
Championship – BHR

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BSSO Site


 

Lambretta Tours of Southern Spain

eca2e8_437321c4c6534400902839a97924f190~mv2_d_2048_1536_s_2I’ve posted about a Lambretta holiday before, notably about the Loco Wheels guys who do guided Lambretta tours of Mallorca (check out their website here). But if the Spanish mainland is more your thing, how about Andalucia?

Lambrettours do unique guided scooter tours in southern Spain. The tours are tailored to offer scooter and bike enthusiasts day trips or accommodation package scootering holidays touring and visiting the famous whitewashed villages of this Malaga region.

You ride a vintage Lambretta (see below for the collection) – through stunning scenery and quiet country roads, for a safe and memorable adventure that you’ll never forget.

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Your guide will be Lambretta enthusiast Darren – who has owned, rebuilt and maintained various models over the last 3 decades. Darren moved to Spain early 2001 and has mapped the best routes of the region to show you what the area has to offer in terms of gastronomy, wine bodegas, historical towns and areas of outstanding beauty. What are you waiting for? 

For more information, including the various tours available, check out the Lambrettours website.

Going Postal…

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Spotted this first class scooter on eBay… A Spanish Post Office (Correos) Serveta, quite rare by all accounts. It’s quite a basic model, lacking the indicators of Serveta’s of similar vintage. If Postman Pedro is anything like the ones that drive our little red vans, they never used the indicators anyway. Anyway, it’s much cooler than the push bikes our lot get to ride. Most of these scoots were scrapped after they went out of service, hence the rarity value, and relatively high price for a ‘basic’ Serveta. It doesn’t need my stamp of approval, but I think it’s got an appeal all of it’s own.
Here it is on eBay

World’s largest Lambretta collection up for sale!

20150506-2904-EditaWhen asked what the ideal number of Lambrettas to own is, the usual answer is ‘one more than I’ve got’. Spanish-based ex-pat Colin Bunn taken that concept and run with it.

Colin has amassed an absolutely incredible collection of Lambrettas (and associated marques), in what must surely be the world’s largest collection of Lambrettas (unless you know different). Now, due to some unfortunate circumstances, most of the collection will be up for sale…

Full story over on ScooterLab, here.

Pic by Sticky.

Y Viva Mallorca!

Mallorca Lambretta Trips!

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Dani got in touch to let me know about his new venture. With his pal Thomas he has set up Loco Wheels –  a Lambretta tours business in sunny Mallorca.

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Dani & Thomas have been into Lambrettas since the 90’s and are now taking the big step of turning their passion into a business.
Currently, they have four classic Lambrettas they’ve loving restored, and a couple of brand new Scomadi 125’s.
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The idea is to take you on a guided tour of hidden Mallorca… going off the beaten track and “getting  lost” in the labyrinth of  Mallorcan back roads. You’ll  discover the secret places tourists never see, and only the locals know about. You stop whenever takes your fancy to enjoy the culture and scenery.

As well as knowing which ‘Lammies friendly’ roads (and tracks!) to ride they also know the best places to sample typical local dishes, so you get a real taste of Mallorca in more ways than one! Your day ends back at Loco Wheels HQ for a drink and a chat.

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If you like the idea of riding a Lambretta, on a beautiful Mediterranean island, in the sunshine, (let’s be honest, what’s not to like) check out their (very cool) Loco Wheels Website, or their Facebook page.

Beautiful Lambretta Art

The standard of the average event flyer has certainly improved over the years. Just as with scooters, there is a huge variety of styles, with some fantastic illustrations. I’ve featured the work of Glenn Reid and Adam Xyl before, here.

12829071_1122361324450118_2663991140094056012_oHere’s another piece of beautiful Lambretta art, in a graphic novel meets art deco illustration style. I’m trying to find out who the artist/designer is so I can give them full credit. I’d have this on the wall, despite the big Vespa logo!

The event itself is run by the Maldito Domingo SC. Based in the Spanish city of Cartagena, a historic port on the Mediterranean coast, it’s the largest scooter event in south-east Spain. Scooters, sand, sea, sun… and if I know the Spanish, great food, wine and beer too.  Find out more here.

Lambretta Serveta Puma Cross

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LamServetaPumaHere’s a bit of a rarity I stumbled across on eBay, a dual Lambretta/Serveta branded scrambler style moped 50cc motorcycle (It ain’t a moped – see the comments).

Now, normally when you see the words ‘very rare’ you can take them with a pinch of salt, but this is the real deal, especially in the UK – although slightly less so in it’s native Spain. Dating from the late ’70’s the Puma came in two variants, the ‘Endure’ and the ‘Puma Cross’ the Puma Cross having 5 gears – itself pretty unusual for a moped.  It’s in need of a little TLC, but comes with a bunch of spares. The only bit that doesn’t look quite right to me is the exhaust… I think the original may have come up a higher, following the lines of the mudguard…

Rarity usually demands a premium in the Lambretta world, but this is currently sitting at just £400. If you’re like the look of it, or just fancy something a bit different for your Lambretta collection get your bid in!
Here’s the eBay link

Spanish D

SpanishD10.00.51Iain Hannay sent me some fantastic pics of a Model D, that he’s just got running…  built in the Eibar factory, in the Spanish Basque country.

SpanishD10.01.01SpanishD10.01.10SpanishD10.01.16SpanishD10.02.24SpanishD10.02.48Now, I see a fair few Spanish Series 2 Lambrettas these days (much more than I used to, for some reason), and Jet 200’s are getting recognised as very desirable scooters… but I haven’t seen many early open frame models. If any, truth be told.

Iain’s D has some nice period accessories, the legshield extenders, and the spare wheel carrier / rack… and I love that oxblood paint. A cracking little scooter, that looks great in the Spanish sunshine!

I’d love to see any other old Spanish Lambrettas… any Spanish LD’s or Series 1’s out there? And what differentiates them from their Italian cousins?