Contemporary Lambretta Art

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Love this painting by Sara Sutton, and contemporary artist from North London.

Sara shares a common history and influences with a lot of scooterists of my generation… Here’s a bit about her in her own words… after my punk phase I fell into the London rockin’ scene at an early age. Cars and scooters featured heavily on the scene as much as the music and clothes. My music interests spread to northern soul and ska and I still love all the music and still enjoy a night out dancing at one of the clubs. Most of my work is centred round my life in London and good times spent out and about…”

You can find more of Sara’s work on her website, here: sarasutton.co.uk
or check it out live at here next exhibition at the Ply Gallery in  Hornsey Town Hall Art Centre on July 20th- 27th

Beautiful Lambretta Art

The standard of the average event flyer has certainly improved over the years. Just as with scooters, there is a huge variety of styles, with some fantastic illustrations. I’ve featured the work of Glenn Reid and Adam Xyl before, here.

12829071_1122361324450118_2663991140094056012_oHere’s another piece of beautiful Lambretta art, in a graphic novel meets art deco illustration style. I’m trying to find out who the artist/designer is so I can give them full credit. I’d have this on the wall, despite the big Vespa logo!

The event itself is run by the Maldito Domingo SC. Based in the Spanish city of Cartagena, a historic port on the Mediterranean coast, it’s the largest scooter event in south-east Spain. Scooters, sand, sea, sun… and if I know the Spanish, great food, wine and beer too.  Find out more here.

Hugo’s LD 150 and Model D watercolours

ld125hugo-10-14002_lambretta_rps23I’ve been following Hugo’s blog for a while now, he has set himself the task of producing a fresh new drawing every day and posting it on his blog… something he’s been doing for over three years now. His watercolour sketches have a wonderful combination of “looseness” and accuracy. In a recent visit to MuVIM ( Valencian Museum of Enlightenment & Modernity – now theres a title!), he sketched the Lambretta Model D, and LD on display, along with two Spanish bikes. I don’t know about you, but I think he has really caught the essence of the machines!  To cap it all I even got a mention in his blog, which made my day! Check out the original post here, and his blog here.

Pop Artist

If I said the name Horace Panter you would probably think of The Specials, at least if you have a decent taste in music and you’re of a certain age! As Sir Horace Gentleman, he was (and still is) the bassist for one of the most iconic bands of the ’80s, spearheading the 2-Tone movement. What you may not know is that Horace and Jerry Dammers met at Art School… where they were both studying  Fine Art.

Today, Horace is very much a painter as well as a musician. He paints in a very Pop Art style… following the mantra of ‘elevating the mundane’, taking a fresh look at the familiar, encouraging the viewer to see ‘everyday’ objects/people with new eyes. I can see influences of British Pop Art’s leading figures, Peter Blake, and also of one of his pupils… Ian Dury (also an accomplished artist) in his work.

Horace’s paintings are often inspired by random events and people. One such painting, ‘The Scooterist’ resulted from a chance meeting with a posse of scooterists outside Coventry’s Transport Museum.The Scooterist © Copyright Horace Panter Art 2014

Horace was asked by local filmmaker, Richard Wood, to participate in promoting a charity event to raise funds for Clare House Hospice in Liverpool. This involved the car, HERBIE (from the eponymous film) being driven from Liverpool to Monte Carlo and Horace joined Lady Godiva (Pru Poretta) on its journey from The Ricoh Arena to the Transport Museum. This short journey was accompanied by a whole raft of vintage VW’s and an honour guard of local scooterists.

It is generally true that scooterists are fans of The Specials so while they were all busy snapping photographs of Horace, he decided to reciprocate and turned his camera on them. Sifting through his photographs later, he turned his attention to the remarkable detail on the scooters and decided to paint one with its rider on board in his typical icongraphic style. He says: ‘There were some amazing scooters … really detailed. All that stuff about pride in appearance, everything just right in terms of both scooter and scooterist, I love it.

Horace didn’t know who the rider was so he put out a call on Facebook and Twitter to ask if anyone could identify the mystery scooterist. Within minutes, responses started to come in and they weren’t all the same! However, half a dozen people pointed to Carl Barlow from the Low Numbers Scooter Club in Leamington Spa. 
It was definitely him, as other photos testified. Horace then contacted Carl by sending him a message on Facebook but by then Carl had had dozens of texts and emails from his friends to tell him that Horace had painted his portrait. Happily, mystery solved. Carl says ‘Over the moon that Horace has chosen to do the pic of me; it’s a real honour! I’m thrilled that he will be letting me have a print. It’s a wonderful painting … not just because I’m in it!’ I’m with Carl on that. There is a real ‘iconic’ feel to the work.

The original painting has been sold. There is a limited edition of 35 prints (40 x 23 cm) available from the galleries listed on Horace’s website: HoracePanterArt, where you can check out his other work, including his series of ‘Cassette’ paintings. You can also check out his Facebook page, and follow him on Twitter.

A big thank you to Clare in helping me put this post together.

Bolt

Bolt LondonOnline mate David Hardy, designer and Lambrettista, has designed the identity for a new kind of shop… Bolt, in Hackney, London. I’ve had to go to Hackney a few times recently, and there’s a real buzz about the place… lots of positive energy, and good stuff happening, and Bolt is one of them.

Bolt London T-shirt
So Bolt… it’s a showroom for one-off, custom built motorcycles, a hang-out / meeting point for ride-outs, a shop for a range of perfectly chosen apparel, and a gallery… all inspired by the motorcycling lifestyle. And when I say motorcycling, it’s a broad church, you are as likely to see a vintage Vespa or Lammie parked up outside as a BSA or a Triumph. I haven’t managed to get down to Bolt yet, but it’s on my list next time I’m over Hackney way.

Check out the website, and follow them on Facebook.

The amazing cardboard sculptures of Chris Gilmour

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Well, after a couple of posts about wooden Vespa’s… I thought it was time for a cardboard Lambretta!

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It’s kind of hard to believe, but this beauty is made out of two things only. Cardboard and glue. And that’s it. No wooden frame. No hidden supporting metal structure. It’s one of the self imposed restrictions artist Chris Gilmour adheres to when creating his art. And it art, of the highest quality in my opinion. There’s something about taking cardboard, that humblest of materials, so often overlooked and discarded and creating something beautiful. Something that makes you look afresh at the original objects too. I don’t know if I’ve got Chris’s vision… but that’s my personal take. And it’s not just scooters and other vehicles (although they are my favourites) … Chris has created everything from wheelchairs to typewriters… microscopes to lifesize sculptures of Queen Victoria. Amazing stuff. Find out more on his website.
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More Lambretta art

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Here’s a wonderful Lambretta illustration I stumbled across on Flickr, by smallish fish. There’s a load of rubbish scooter art out there, but this would look great on a canvas on any Lambrettista’s wall. Yvie is the talented designer behind the drawing, get in touch, and bung her a few quid, I’m sure she’ll be happy. And if you like her style, you can by her little book of nonsense poems, drawing and photographs, for the heady sum of £2.50 from here.