Doug Miller Cutdown on eBay

DougMillerCutdownI’ll hold my hands up, I’m not any kind of expert on scooter racing, past or present. But there are some names that you can’t help recognising if you’ve got even a passing interest. One of those is Doug Miller of East London Racing. And one of his cutdowns is for sale on eBay.

It’s one of those items that probably looks like either a horde of treasure or (if you’re not in the know) a pile of junk. I’d love to see sympathetically restored – a ‘conserved restoration’ retaining the charm and patina of the years, rather than a shiny new rebuild.

If that’s a project you feel you would love to take on, here’s the eBay link.

Super S-Type on eBay

AF-SuperS-Type2Super, according to the dictionary means; an article of a superior quality, grade, size, etc.;  very good; first-rate; excellent.” This Super S-Type, for sale on eBay, is Super. Perhaps even Super-Dooper.

There are a ton of Lammies for sale on eBay, but I only post the ones that really float my boat. This one does, in spades. A proper ’80s style S-Type GP complete with glitter-flake paint. Perhaps it’s the sad demise of funkster Prince has got me in a purple mood. Whatever it is, this scoot has all the relevant AF Rayspeed invoices including initial invoice detailing all work done to convert to a Super S-Type.  It’s even got Ray Kemp’s signature, on the spare wheel. If you’ve always had a yen for an S-Type, Here’s the link on eBay

Sticky’s thoughts on the ‘New Lambretta’

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Some valuable insights here by Sticky, on ScooterLab regarding the L70 the ‘New Lambretta’ to be launched in (as I write) 11 days. I make that Tuesday the 3rd of May. Not too long to wait, and worth getting over to the Lambretta Consortium site and registering for the chance to win ‘one of five’ new Lambrettas.

One of the nuggets of information in Sticky’s article is that the design of the L70 is likely to be by Austrian designer Gerald Kiska, rather than the designer of the LN, Alessandro Tartarini. Amongst several ‘generic’ scooters studio Kiska has also been responsible for an update to historic Swedish Motorcycle brand Husqvarna (now probably more famous these days for making chainsaws and the like).

There is a quote in the  Husqvarna case study that says “They don’t make them like they used to because today’s riders are forward thinking.  They are interested in the future of bike design, not what’s behind them.  The 401 VITPILEN delivers what they want: “retro futurism done right I’m pretty sure most Lambretta buyers are interested in ‘what’s behind them’ but the concept of retro futurism done right sounds pretty good to me.

Here’s the link to Sticky’s article again.

Czech this out!

Cezeta1The Cezeta is back – and it hasn’t changed a bit (apart from being electric!). The distinctive Czech scooter has returned in a design virtually unchanged from the original models produced in the ’50s and ’60s. And it’s all the better for it. You’d be hard pushed to spot any difference between these new models and the originals – in fact, you’d be on a hiding to nothing as the prototypes shown are originals, modified to fit the new power unit.

cezeta-home-02-1200That’s the one BIG change. As mentioned… she’s electric! Some will mourn the passing of the original 175cc 2-stroke engine, but this is the 20-teens and an electric power unit is the way forward. She’s got a top end of 50mph and a range of 60 miles (extendable to 120m). That’s plenty to commute in style.

Regarding the styling… it’s certainly unique. I’ve been less than kind to the Cezeta in the past, but I’m warming to the Cezeta’s idiosyncratic looks. Perhaps is years of conditioning so my brain thinks a Lambretta is the way a scooter should look.  There’s something quite hipster (in a good way) about them, and they’re far more attractive (and authentic) than the majority of modern attempts to create a retro scoot.

Although by nature I’m a bit of a traditionalist, I’m also firmly in the EV (Electric Vehicle) camp. I think this scoot marries the best of both. Retro styling, with a modern, clean power unit. There was talk of an Electric Scomadi a while back, (last I heard it they are still “working on it”)  and, although unlikely, maybe – just maybe we’ll see an electric version of the “new Lambretta” the L70 on launch (more of that later!).

There’s a ton of more information, including a road test and an interview with one of the guys behind the revitalised Cezeta brand (brit Neil Smith) over on the ScooterLab site.

It’s great to see these ‘lesser known’ (in the UK anyway) scooter marques making a comeback, with Cezeta joining the likes of Lohner and Cushman. Find out more at the Cezeta website, where you can reserve yours today, or pop over to Prague and visit their shop.

The video’s worth a watch too…

The final rideout…

dsc00132We often don’t like to think about our own mortality, but there comes a time in your life when you start going to as many funerals as weddings. And we probably all know somebody in the scootering scene who has passed on, usually far too early.

dsc00119Although obviously sad affairs, the best funerals can be wonderful too, especially when you celebrate a life, and the passions of the deceased. What better way for someone that loved their scoots to make the final journey in a Lambretta powered hearse?

dsc00129To quote the websiteOur unique Scooter Hearse draws together an authentic Series 3 Lambretta professionally converted to a trike by a master coach builder, the same craftsman also fabricated the Hearse that is pulled behind. Beautifully combined this set up pays complete respect to the deceased, a person who had a love for the scooter, the scene that surrounds it, a scene that to those outside can sometimes seem extraordinary but for those in the know is something magical.”

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Personally, I can’t think of a better way to celebrate the life  of a scooterist. That number plate’s good too.

Contact Modified Funerals, Telephone: 074 6841 0057
Email: modifiedfunerals@gmail.com
or via their website, here.

 

Damm fine photography

lightbox_brightonI’ve often featured the work of talented photographers on the blog, and Dammo is the latest of the bunch. Dammo specialises in capturing British subcultures with their inherent diversity, quirkiness and definitive style. The majority of his work reflects his own personal interests in music and cultural movements: be it Northern Soul, Mod, Rockabilly, 50s R&B or the Scooter Scene. However, individual commissions will be considered.

Photography with Soul.

Dammo’s photography is stylish, crisp and detailed, in terms of tone and colour, offering a document of time and place. There is a vintage flavour to his work, but with a fresh modern perspective, demonstrating a graphic designers eye, combined with a photographers passion for the subject and the art of making the observer feel present in the event. He offers bespoke quality pictures depicting events and people in a way that illustrates the emotion and intrinsic timeless nature of British sub cultural movements, whether it be for editorial purposes, display or web.

Book him, Dammo.

For photographic enquiries you can call Dammo on: 0777 219 7276 or email him hereAlteratively, follow him on Facebook or Twitter to keep up to date with his latest work.

All images featured in this post are used with permission and are copyright ©Dammo Photography 2014. All rights reserved.

 

Lambrettas – Made in the USA!

When writing this blog, I often stumble across something that makes me think “I never knew that!” This is one of the biggest I never knew that’s” so far… Lambrettas were briefly made in an Innocenti factory in Duluth, Minnesota, United States of America (if you don’t know where Duluth is, it’s Mippeappolis and up a bit, on the North East side of Lake Superior).

I came across this story on the Lambretta Club USA’s Lambretta Jamboree page (the Lammy Jammy this year is in Duluth), here, where the video I’ve posted above explains “Minnesota Connection”

As part of the Lammy Jammy celebrations in Duluth, you have the chance of winning a very rare “Wintermaster S2 Prototype” (pictured below) recovered from abandoned Duluth factory. It’s currently being restored back to its former glory. More on the  Wintermaster here.11745717_474679806026407_621771586671911275_n

So as well as being made in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Argentina, Brazil, India, Pakistan and Taiwan (have I missed anywhere?) Lammbrettas were also briefly made in the USA*. I came across this info a few weeks ago, but thought it was worth waiting for this particular day before I shared it. Alert readers may have spotted the posting date already. One more thing… further research shows this project the code name “Pesce d’Aprile”.