4-Stroke V-Twin Moto Rumi…

I *thought* I’d a written a piece all about the Moto Rumi Formichino before… but all I could find in the Lambrettista archives was this post – basically a paragraph, and period photo, and me saying “I thought I’d written a piece about Moto Rumi’s before…” Deja vu, all over again. Another bullet point for the ever expanding to do list!

Moto Rumi Formichino

I’m assuming my audience is familiar with the Rumi Formichino (if you’re not, there’s a picture above). It’s a lovely little scooter from a company based in Bergamo, Italy that made minature submarines and torpedoes for the Italian navy during WW2. Knowing that, gives some context to the unique design language of the Formichino (Italian for Ant, dontcha know). The Formichino did rather well in various sporting events of the day, and has a loyal following even now.

With that rather long-winded introduction out the way, and the Formichino acknowledged, we can now get to the meat of the post. Moto Rumi had plans for a quite breathtaking scooter, that sadly never made it into production. Ostensibly more a ‘traditionally’ styled scooter, with fully enclosed bodywork, the real innovations of the machine lie beneath those glorious streamlined shapes. But before we get to that, lets just dwell on the bodywork for a minute, shall we? Remember, this was 1960. So we’re talking circa LI Series 2 in Lambretta design terms. So this svelte little Rumi was definitely ‘up there’ in the design stakes.

Under the panels there were more innovations…The Rumi having a very neat looking V-Twin, 4-Stroke engine – developed to be also used in the light motorcycles. On a motorcycle of course, you have to worry less about keeping the engine cool, something Rumi addressed by having ample venting cut into the all-steel bodywork, both at the front and the rear… the rear vents of course allowing the hot air to escape.

A look at that V-Twin engine… and a glimpse of exposed chain.

Those rear vents may have got a bit hot, but they look really cool – as is the line of that seat, smoothly merging into the bodywork of the machine at the back – way ahead of the bench seat of Lambretta’s TV’s – in the design stakes at least.

The gloriously funky rear venting in the sidepanels… a rear light that looks like a bit of an afterthought, but to counter that, check out the way that seat glides into the bodywork, Ancelloti style.

Available in 98, 125, and 175cc variants with hand-shift, four-speed gearboxes, these sleek little scooters would surely have given Lambretta and Vespa a run for their money, if they’d make it into production. Sadly, Moto Rumi went bust before that could happen.

The Moto Rumi at the Amsterdam Salone. You can see a Formichino photobombing in the background, trying to get in on the act! There’s also what looks like a go-kart – another market Rumi were dabbling in.

While researching this article, I found out Moto Rumi made another scooter that I was unaware of, the Scoiottolo (or Squirrel), which pre-dates the Formichino. That to do list is getting longer…


Finally, here’s a couple of press pieces from the time. Thanks due once more to regular contributor Darrin Slack, who sent me the pictures and the story of the Moto Rumi’s that never were. The images and press articles are from the Amsterdam Salone of 1961, an important show of the time.


Find out more about Moto Rumi on this site: MotoRumi.IT.

Rumi Formichino

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The Moto Rumi Formichino is a really nice little scooter that I have posted about before*. A true original, when many manufacturers were trying to copy Lambretta and Vespa, and on the whole, making a pretty poor fist of it, or trying to shoe-horn their motorcycle technology into a scooter chassis, Rumi went their own way. I think it’s a really clever, elegant design too. It attracted a loyal band of owners, especially of the sporting fraternity, and is still an admired and sought after scooter today. The current Moto Rumi club has over 100 members from around the world.

*I’m certain I wrote a piece about Moto Rumi’s before, but I buggered if I can find it in the blog archives. If I do, I’ll repost.

Scooters at the Peterson Automotive Museum

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There’s some beautiful scooters over at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, where alongside the Americana, historic vehicles and supercars they are running a special Scooters Exhibit until May next year. Here’s a video of what you can expect to see if you go.

There’s a lot here that fits into my own person category of “oddball”, which basically means anything that isn’t a Lambretta or V*spa… please note that is not a derogatory term, I would love to own a Moto Rumi for example… I’m even starting to see the charm of those Cushmans and Salisburys these days!
If you’re in the LA locale, it’s worth a visit.

Video, and heads up from JohnnyScoots