The Triumph T10 – The prettiest British Scooter?

s-l1600-1Spotted this pretty little Triumph on eBay. Lovely clean lines for a scooter that doesn’t originate in Italy! Dare I say, it’s prettier than a J? Dare I? Nah, not on here. But’s it’s close. It apparently “drives very nice” and “everything works as it should” (Buyers words, so do your own checks). It’s listed at a pretty reasonable £1,950, but he’s open to offers, as he’s not sure how much it’s worth. I’d say he’s pitched it about right?

It comes with a load of paperwork. Which is always nice! Here’s the eBay link

The Triumph T10 – also known as the Triumph Tina – was the lightweight sister scooter to the better known Triumph Tigress. Made between 1962 and 1970 it was marketed at women, in a campaign fronted by Peter Pan of Pop Cliff Richard (I’d love to see some original publicity material if anybody’s got any – I’ve tried finding some online to no avail!). Technically the Tina was quite advanced – an early ‘auto’ using a continuously variable transmission system with a centrifugal clutch. There were even plans, and actual prototypes for a three-wheeler version – predating Piaggio’s MP3 by decades!

Lots more info about the Tina / T10 and her big sis the Tigress on the TriumphScooters website.

SoopaDoopa Scootacar

scootacar_heroLong time readers will have my spotted my penchant for a microcar… and this British designed & built Scootacar is a cracker. Made by The Hunslet Engine Company from Leeds, it was allegedly designed for one of the directors who wanted something easier to park than her Jag!

This is a Mk.1 from 1961, in “outstanding & running” condition – it comes with an extensive history file, original sales literature, current V5c with original number plate, and even a (very collectable) SAMs die cast model. All the spares left-over from the restoration are included, along with original rear LEP lights.

It’s on eBay for a shade under £25k.

Here’s the link

Peel Trident

729x191xPeelP50_features_r1_c1.png.pagespeed.ic.hfMk8vxZDBI’ve always loved these little British bubble cars. The 50cc Peel P50 (above), famously driven around the BBC offices at White City by Jeremy Clarkson (and John Humphrys) for Top Gear took the microcar concept to it’s logical conclusion, and gained a Guinness World Record for being the smallest car in the world. Well, you may have heard that the Peel is back. Available in an original 50cc moped engined version, and now a 1.5Kw electric version, it’s made appearances on Dragons Den and Cadbury’s Adverts.

trident_01Since the apparent demise of the Messerschmitt-alike Smite concept,  it’s the space age Trident that would be my microcar of choice. With it’s fifties flying saucer looks, it’s going to turn heads wherever you go. Originally designed as a shopping car, it was classed as a ‘saloon scooter’. The new electric version is fully road legal in the UK. The only fly in the ointment, and its a rather big, Jeff Goldblum sized fly, is it’s range… a measly 15 miles on a full charge. I’d expect it to make it to at least Saturn. trident_03

If you fancy your very own Peel Trident, proudly made in Britain, there’s an handful of them left, with prices starting from £12,999. So, not all that cheep to buy, but incredibly cheap to run… as they say, almost cheaper than walking 🙂

Find out more on the Peel Engineering website.

Stunning new lids from Birkinhead

Regualr readers will know I like a Davida helmet. And I was a big fan of their “Cosmic Candy” range… which I thought would set off a 70’s style skelly to a tee… Well, now you’ve got even more choice from the Birkinhead helmet artisans. Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls… I present metalflake!David Metalflake

I can do no better than quote from their press release… “The attention to detail, the depth of light and colour: the visual effect of the results is stunning. Davida helmets feel wonderfully luxurious and protective given their snug fitting and leather-lined construction and are well proven for all types of riding adventures.”

Pricewise, they’re not the cheapest helmets on the market, but quality never is is, is it? And the one thing you don’t want to be scrimping on is a bash hat. Davida Jet & Ninety2 RRP £378. Davida Speedster RRP £365 + VAT

With their international reputation for integrating the finest features of traditional open face helmets into modern safety products, all Davida’s supremely comfortable range of helmets are now available in more than 100 different colour ways. See the website for full details.

I want candy…

What’s better than candy? Cosmic Candy of course… and that’s the name of the range of helmets from British manufacturer Davida. Colourways that have been inspired by the ‘candy apple’ paint effect popularised within the American Hot Rod,  Chopper, and then the UK Scootering scene. They’d look great with any classic Lammie… but particularly if you’ve got a ’70’s style skelly!DavidaCandyColourwaysThe new Cosmic Candy range is launched in six colours, Cosmic Candy Silver-150, Cosmic Candy Red-151, Cosmic Candy Blue-155, Cosmic Candy Yellow-153, Cosmic Candy Green-154 & Cosmic Candy Burgundy -152

All Davida helmets are available in any one of the 100 colourways in their distinctive range and traditional colours. Inspired by racers and street cultures of the past, from burning flame of the road racers to the checks, national flags and pinstripes of street culture, each design is individually created by hand using time-honoured techniques and lacquered to a high quality finish. They also offer a bespoke service to create your own colourway.

The new Cosmic Candy range of colourways are available on any Davida helmet model. RRP UK is £265.00 for the Davida Jet and Ninety2. Davida Speedster & Classic helmets RRP UK £220.83 ex VAT.Davida LogoCheck out their website for more info, including the range of products and distributors and dealers worldwide..

Then, as an added treat, watch the BowWowWow video below:

Book review: Mods! By Richard Barnes

Mods! by Richard BarnesI had this book back in the day, shortly after it was published. It became my bible… a revelation, an eyeopener, source of information, and the definitive reference work when it came to solving arguments. I bought it from the sadly missed ‘Books, Bits & Bobs’ from Kingston-upon-Thames, a cavernous place that sold a vast array of pin badges, patches, books, comics, posters and all sorts of other ephemera… and they weren’t picky, the mod stuff was intermingled with the 2tone, punk and heavy metal patches. It was across one road from the cinema where I first saw Quadrophenia, and across another from Jack Brendon’s, the clothes shop that sold an unlikely mix of Mod and Teddy Boy gear.

But I digress. Back to the book. Firstly, it’s worth buying for the pictures alone. And there are a ton of them. In fact most of the 128 pages are pics. And they’re great. A lot have been reproduced over the years in various other formats, and all over the internet, but there’s nothing like having them together as a collection. And they close inspection! There’s a load of scooter pics, as well as clothing, hairstyle and music shots. There are also a fair few reprints from 60’s newspapers, lots about the the seaside battles of Brighton, Margate, Clacton and the like. The text is insightful and although the author, Richard Barnes, was by his own admission not a mod himself, he was at the heart of the scene and saw it happening all around him. In fact, being a slightly removed, dispassionate observer has probably made this a stronger, and less biased book.

To finish my story, this book became a part of my library in the early eighties. Much read, much loved. And then, in a clearout it ended up in a charity shop. Doh! So, for many years, I didn’t have it. And then, my lovely wife got me a copy for Christmas. Only then I realised how much I had missed it!

I know more that most, that being a Lambretta rider doesn’t automatically make you a mod, and you may even hate the tag. But you’ll more than likely have more than a passing interest in the scene. A scene that has not only become a integral part of British subculture, and cultural history… been at the root of many revivals over the years, and passed on essential elements to many youth cultures that have followed it. Do yourself a favour, and add this book to your library.
It doesn’t tell the whole story of Mod as a movement, and there are other books that deal with other aspects of the scene. But this book was the original, and as mods will know, the original is often the best.

Get it here on Amazon

Straight from the 70’s… the future of motorcycling… the Quasar!

quasar_wf Quasar_2_wfHot on the heels of Future Shock, here’s another bike straight out of the future. Yesterdays future. I saw a pic of this bike somewhere recently, and it reminded me of the classic 70’s Bond Bug I posted about on my original CrocodileJock blog way back. I vaguely remember it, probably from Tomorrow’s World, or the original Top Gear with William Woollard.Bond Bug

Anyway, my usual cursory ‘research’ has revealed it was a British bike,  designed and built in 1975 by Malcolm Newell and Ken Leaman. Although it had much to commend it, particularly the build quality, it also had its problems. Its long wheelbase led to it having an enormous turning circle, and the fact that your feet were up on running boards, made stopping a problem, apparently. Although it’s never really been a problem with scooters…Quasars + Bond bug

It was a project that never really lived up to it’s early promise, and only 22 Quasars were built. But it was a bold, innovative and interesting idea, and one that, in more recent years, has reappeared in more successful (but, in my opinion, far duller) models such as the BMW C1. quasar3 quasar7 quasar2 quasar1988739_515669001851371_74223166_n

More info here and here, and that’s where I nicked the pictures from too.