NEW Lambretta frames & forks to be manufactured

cat_lambretta7-1230x800With the announcement that there were to be new engine casings made for Lambrettas it seemed we are entering a second ‘golden age’ for Lambretta ownership (if you can afford to get you ‘foot on the ladder’ – or should that be floorboard?). With a new official Lambretta – The Vendetta – in the offing, and the majority of parts for classic GP / S3 Lambrettas are either being remade (often as improvements on the original equipment – tubeless rims for example), or available as ‘New Old Stock’. The likes of eBay, and the number of knowledgeable dealers (see my Lambretta specialists page for a list) even makes hunting down parts for rarer models less onerous.

But theres always been a missing link. You need an original frame to bolt everything on to. Well, maybe not anymore. Vittorio Tessera of Casa Lambretta is looking to manufacture Lambretta frames and forks again in Italy.

The ramifications of this are far from obvious, but luckily for me, somebody far more knowledgeable (Sticky) has thought it all through. So if you want to know whether it would actually be possible to build an old scooter on a new frame, or whether new frames might increase the scooter theft problem of scumbags ‘ringing’ scoots… head over to ScooterLab for the full gen.

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Latest whispers on the L70 Lambretta Vendetta

unnamed-5Further rumours (from a reliable source) have reached Lambrettista Towers concerning the new official Lambretta. The name, Vendetta, as suspected, refers to the ongoing family rivalry between Vespa and Lambretta. L70 is the code name referencing Lambretta’s 70th anniversary in 2017.

The scooter is going to be a “No Compromise” high-end machine… aimed at customers who are willing to pay a little more for a quality product. So, it’s not some cheap, ‘plastic fantastic’.

The rumoured specs are interesting (and positive) too;  Steel cage bodywork built around a tubular frame, steel legshields, aluminium handlebars/switches and decorative trim, removable sidepanels with interchangeable plastic, sheet metal and carbon fibre options. Initial Vendetta models will be powered by a range of air-cooled engines, in 50, 125 and 180cc capacities. There is talk of a water-cooled model in development. (If you read an earlier version of this post I’d got this the wrong way round).

There is also plans for a range of aftermarket parts. Stock plastic parts will be interchangeable with carbon fibre parts. The sidepanels will be 3d printable or steel. There’s serious talk of a high-performance tuning kit. So, much like a classic Lambretta, you’ll be able to specify and customise your Vendetta ‘your way’.

As mentioned in previous posts, the scooter is designed by Internationally renowned design house Kiska (famous for their relaunch of the classic Swedish Husqvarna motorcycle marque and ongoing work with the ever innovative Austrian brand KTM).

Detailed specs will follow soon, keep watching this space.

 

250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle

PA-2011_Lam250GP-002I came across these great shots of the 250cc Grand Prix Racing Motorcycle in the Australian version of Motorcycle News. The photographer Phil Aynsley had originally seen an old black & white shot of the bike from when it was originally racing, back in the early fifties. The bike stuck in his mind and after stumbling across a recent picture online, Phil tracked the bike down to Vittorio Tessera’s Lambretta collection.

Although the bike did not much success on the track, it has the clean lines of a classic café racer, with a whiff of Moto Guzzi about it. In fact, the overall transverse V-twin design predates the famous Moto Guzzi layout by some 13 years.

All images copyright Phil Aynsley Photography.

Phil is a photographer based in Sydney, Australia. Check out his other photographic work here.