SX… Perfection?

My last post featured a cracking “Rat Racer” Series one… and I thought it was just about perfect. Something I’d love to own. There would be a few little tweaks I’d make… and that’s the way it is with most of the scoots I find. Nearly perfect, but with a couple of tweaks… a bit of chrome there… an accessory added, or removed… but that’s the joy of Lambretta’s. The machines rolled out of the factory, close to perfection… but somehow owners (and dealers) managed to improve them.

But, I think I’ve found a machine where I wouldn’t change a thing. And it’s this stunning SX. Well, an SX 150 S-Type GT 186 to be precise. Everything from the paint colour, to the Ancillotti exhaust screams perfection for me. The raydots at the Smith chrono all add to the package. It’s a classic look, and I don’t think it’s been bettered, to be honest. Perfect.

Lambretta SX 150 S-Type GT 186 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.33.41 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.34.10 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.34.26 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.34.58 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.35.23 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.35.58 Screen shot 2013-07-06 at 07.36.51

This lovely scoot was shot by Christian Gentilini, and you can see more of his photography, here, on flickr. He’s a member of the Lambretta Club Teste Cromate S.C.
The pics are copyright (Christian was kind enough to allow me to use them here) so please respect that.

Oh. I’ve spotted it. The tweak I’d make to this scooter. The crankcase side panel has something missing… it needs “Owned and run by Crocodile Jock” discretely signwritten on it. Small in the bottom right corner. And maybe a small enamel union flag badge under the sprint rack. There you go… proved… Lambrettisti just can’t help tinkering with perfection!

Innocenti Mini

Innocenti MiniBrowsing the Nerves Autos site I mentioned yesterday I found a couple of nice Innocenti items. A 1971 Mk2 Mini, and an Innocenti Small.

The mini is a lovely little car, resprayed in it’s original pea green colour, and restored to the high standards demanded by FIVA, and the ASI Targa Oro (Gold Plate) …only given to vehicles restored to original condition.

Innocenti Mini Mini-1001-0001 Mini-1001-0006 Mini-1001-0002 It’s in lovely condition throughout, I particularly like the original “Mille Miglia” wheels, and the small, Italian front number plate – I don’t know the rules of keeping this in the UK, but as a historic vehicle, your might be ok. I think it’s a bit of a bargain at €5.700.  More here.

Innocenti Small 500 LSThe other car an Innocenti Small – a 500cc dating from 1993. While not as immediately attractive as the Mini, it’s got a late 80’s/early 90’s appeal all of it’s own… a future classic, and an steal at €1.900. Maybe.Alfa-Romeo-Junior-1300-GT-Scalino-1972-0000

Unfortunately sold, and rather more to my personal taste, is a rather nice 1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider, but there’s a lovely 1970 Giulia GT 1300 Junior Scalino still available. And you won’t find many small, sporty saloons prettier than that.

1954 Lambretta F on eBay

Lambretta F Screen shot 2013-06-10 at 08.03.54 Screen shot 2013-06-10 at 08.04.16 Screen shot 2013-06-10 at 08.04.35 Screen shot 2013-06-10 at 08.04.55There’s a stunning Lambretta F on eBay, in it’s original maroon colour. Originally part of the famous Mike Karslake collection, this rare  scooter would turn heads wherever it went. And, as we now know, these scooters can now fly!

Brazilian Series 2 Restoration

Nice little video of a restoration of a Brazilian 1966 Series 2 Lambretta. She looked pretty good in it’s original black livery, but two years of hard work and “stress, irritation and headache” (we’ve all been there!) transformed her into a thing of beauty. It’s and interesting game to spot the differences between the Brazilian S2’s and the Italian ones we are more used to seeing… the first, and most obvious one is the date of manufacture… 1966… five years after production finished on Innocenti machines. Other easy to spot ones are the carb/air filter set up, the exhaust (I quite like the look of that short silencer box!) and the three speed gear change… Cosmetically, the badges are very different, including an attractive rear frame embellisher/ badge. So far, so obvious… how many more differences can you spot?

A neat touch in adding rear indicators to the resto is integrating them with the spare wheel carrier, a nice solution.

Update: I have received an email from Jean, the restorer of this fine Series 2, clearing up a few things. Firstly, was the matter of colour… I stated that the original paint was black, and that was just a case of me being sloppy with my english. What I should have written, of course, is existing paint. Brazilian S2’s were only made in an “off white” shade – I’m guessing this would be something similar to the original Italian Ivory (Avoria) colour, but it may be different). The scooter has got four gears, it’s just the numeral 4 has worn off on the handlebar. The exhaust system is off of a later Lambretta, (one native to Brasil that deserves a post all of it’s own – The Cynthia), and has the fish tail on the silencer is a one off, custom item hand made by an iron worker.

The true spirit of motorcycling…


These days, when I’m out on my Series 2, I get more “thumbs up” from riders of BSA and Triumphs than modern auto scooters… funny how things change. Anyway, this video raised a smile. After yesterdays horrific events In London, I need something to make me smile.

I think that’s a Cezeta… I don’t think Innocenti had much to worry about on the design front! And a petrol tank built into the front fender? Who’s bright idea was that!?

Siambretta Model D Twin. That’s right. Twin cylinders!

Saimbrettas, as you probably know, are the Lambretta variants build under licence from Innocenti by SIAM Lambretta, in Argentina.

SIAM’s relationship with Innocenti dates back to 1954, and the Model C… affectionately known as the Pochoneta in Argentina. Apparently, even General Peron was a fan. A Model D equivalent soon followed, known as the “Siambretta 125 Standard” which was the equivalent of the Lambretta Model D… (with the 125 Deluxe being the equivalent of the LD). If you’re Argentinian, or a Siambretta aficionado, and I’ve got any of these facts wrong, please put me right in the comments.

So, history lesson over. What I never expected to see was a Model D Twin… I’m assuming, as my Argentinean Spanish is rather rusty, that it’s two 125cc cylinders, giving a total of 250c. In a D frame. That must go like a rocket! This is the maddest thing I’ve seen for ages.

I’d love to know more, and I’m trying to dig out more details, so hopefully this post will be updated as I find out more. But what a scooter!

Found via the Lambretta Club USA’s Facebook Page.

For a more modern take on Lambretta twins, see my previous post on the 344cc Twin from PM Tuning here.